Gullah Geechee

I spent today at Brookgreen Gardens in Muerlles Inlet, South Carolina attending traveling exhibit from the Geechee Kunda Center, Riceboro, GA.  The exhibit showcases the Gullah Geechee Rice Culture with storyboards, photographs, artifacts, tools, relics, and implements.

The Gullah Geechee Corridor runs from Wilmington, North Carolina to St. Augustine, Florida.

Ron Daise, Brookgreen’s Vice-President for Creative Education, author, and historian and learn about the people, language, and culture of the Gullah Geechee people whose ancestors were enslaved from West Africa and brought here to work on plantations. Isolated on coastal barriers island their unique culture endures today. Through songs, stories, and audience participation Daise brings the Gullah culture to life and you will leave with a new appreciation and understanding of “Wha E Mean fa Be Gullah!”.

Ron Daise, Brookgreen’s Vice-President for Creative Education, author, and historian and learn about the people, language, and culture of the Gullah Geechee people whose ancestors were enslaved from West Africa and brought here to work on plantations. Isolated on coastal barriers island their unique culture endures today. Through songs, stories, and audience participation Daise brings the Gullah culture to life and you will leave with a new appreciation and understanding of “Wha E Mean fa Be Gullah!”.

Ron told us about his two trips to West Africa and how DNA confirmed his mother was from Siara Leone and his father from Gana in West Africa.  Ron was raised by Gullah parents and grew up in a Gullah community in South Carolina.  He accompanied a 10 year old slave girls decendants to West Africa.  She was captured in Siara Leone and sold to an English slave traitor ship in the 1800’s.  The reason slaves were taken from this area was that they knew rice farming and could bring more money than slaves taken from other parts of Africa.

Enjoy the shots I took today at the program.   I forgot my camera this morning so had to use my cell.

Traditional Gullah Baskets

Gullah blanket and tools

Typical Gullah quilt

Broom in the back

Gullah chamber pot and basin

Gullah Geechee Iron Pot

Corn Shucker

Gullah dough tray

Gullah in typical dress

Gullah People

Geechee/Seminole Spirit Catcher

Picture of Gullah Rice Farmers

West African fishing net and basket

Original artwork of Vivian Mitchell of Riceboro, GA 
depicts acts that represent the continuity of South African 
Culture in America by the Gullah Geechee People.
Vivian Mitchell is a resident artist at Kunda Geechee
Museum in Riceboro, GA
I know this page was a little heavy to load but I wanted to share some of my photos.  It was a lovely day,  Then only thing that could have been better – the weather, it rained cats and dogs all day.  

About Wanda

I am a Catholic widow, mother, grandmother, friend and according to my kids just a little bit crazy. My faith is paramount in my life. Spending time with my family, especially my four grandchildren is one of my most treasured blessings. I love Redskins football, Phillies baseball, NASCAR, quilting, genealogy and I am a bibliophile and struggling blogger.
This entry was posted in Brookgreen Gardens, Gullah Geechee, Gullah Geechee Corridor, West Africa. Bookmark the permalink.

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